If you’re new to betting then some of the scribbles you see on betting slips can look like a foreign language, but this article will show you the basics of how to write out a bet slip in a betting shop; either on the high street or at the racecourse.

Even if you only bet a couple of quid a year on the Grand National we’ll at least have your betting slip looking like a professional had scribed it…

WRITING OUT A BET SLIP

Your research is done, you’ve found that horse or that football team that looks like a dead cert, and you’re ready to risk your hard earned cash on it winning. Time to grab a betting slip, and a pen, and write it up.

The information you need to place a bet is fairly straightforward, and the following method will produce a slip that is easy to read and will avoid any confusion at the counter.

HORSE RACING BETS

To write a horse racing bet out you will need to know the name of the horse, the time of the race, the racecourse and the odds offered – this is the information you need to get from the various screens and papers in a betting shop (or online beforehand).

NB: The odds offered change frequently, so it is best to get the latest odds from the counter or from a live screen in the betting shop. The other information needed comes from yourself, and that is how much you want to bet.

Let’s say you have chosen a horse called Secret Pie in the 3.55 at Haydock. The screen in the betting shop shows that it is available at 6/1. You have budgetted £4 for this race. You can now write your slip.

Grab a blank betting slip and write the horse’s name with the race time and course next to it.

Underneath write the odds and draw a large ‘C’ around them (example in image below) – this means you are taking the current odds available, which are 6/1 in this example.

Then write your stake amount and the type of bet (win, each way, etc). In this example we were going for a £4 win bet. Finally, at the bottom of the slip there is usually a box to write in your total stake for that slip – easy, this is £4 again as there is just one bet on this slip.

Here’s what your slip should look like…

How to write out a betting slip

Here’s what your slip would look like if you went £2 each way.

each way betting slip

Go hand your slip in at the counter, give them your stake money and you’ll get a copy receipt back for you to keep and (hopefully) hand in later to get your winnings. Try not to lose it!

Sports Betting Slips

If you’re looking to bet on the outcome of a sporting event such as a football match or golf tournament then the same fundamentals apply as above but the time and the venue aren’t usually necessary.

Here’s an example for betting on a football match…

You think Everton can beat Manchester United at home, and are attracted by the relatively large odds of 4/1 that are on offer. Take a blank betting slip and simply write ‘Everton to beat Man United’, with the odds underneath (don’t forget the ‘C’) and your stake. That’s it, simple, but here’s an example image…

how to write football bet slip

For a golf tournament, just write the name of the golfer, ‘To Win’, the tournament name, the odds and your stake. An example might be Tiger Woods, To Win, The Masters, 6/1, £3.50, as shown below:

golf betting slip

The staff in bookmakers are always very helpful and can give you advice on how to write out a slip. Don’t ask the staff to write your slip out for you as they will often have to refuse due to the policies of the bookmaker they work for. They can tell you what to write though if you need guidance. Also, don’t be offended if they check the odds you have written down on their system before the bet is placed, after all they need to make sure people aren’t writing 100/1 for Chelsea to beat Stevenage!

Disputes are rare, but they can sometimes happen if a mistake has been made when the bets are settled. If your bet slip has been written out clearly in an easy to read manner as we have shown above then you will have everything you need in your hand to settle the dispute one way or the other (i.e. to show whether you or they are wrong).